The Hunter’s Moon

This is an image I took last night of the Hunter’s moon which is also a Supermoon! I’ve uploaded the large version so click this image to see it (you maybe have to click a second time to expand it).

Hunter's Moon and SuperMoon on 15th October 2016

Hunter’s Moon and SuperMoon on 15th October 2016

So essentially a supermoon is when the full moon coincides with the moon’s closest approach to earth during its monthly orbit. It’s normally brighter and bigger than a normal full moon. I had to actually squint to make out the dark areas on the moon’s surface last night and I had no need for any lights setting up or taking down the telescope. It was pretty bright!

This is the link to a live video I did while capturing it, showing how and the equipment used. It can be done with less though.

 

So the term Hunter’s moon is given to the first full moon in October that is after the Harvest Moon (the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox). It’s also known as the Blood Moon (Sanguine Moon) for the apparent orange color of the full moon as it rises above the horizon. The origin of these names most likely lie in American folklore but whatever the origin I can testify that if you are wanting to hunt at night, the Hunter’s moon would make your job a whole lot easier.

Next month, the closest supermoon since 1948!

Don’t miss it! The Supermoon on the 14th November 2016 will be the closest supermoon since 1948. If you miss it you’ll have to wait another 18 years, the 25th Nov 2034 to be exact, to see it as close again! The moon will get within 221,524 miles (356,509 km) of earth and should make for some nice photographs!

My name is David Hamilton and I’m from Northern Ireland but currently living in Puerto Rico. I have a degree in Biochemistry and a M.Phil in molecular virology from Queen’s University Belfast. I write on some of my interests which range from virology, astronomy and science related subjects to history. Thanks for your interest!

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